Friday, October 9, 2009

Inteviews with The Zombie Cookbook contributors (continued)




Today, our first guest from The Zombie Cookbook is Lisa Haselton.

1. Hi Lisa, what attracted you to this particular anthology?

It sounded like fun...a zombie cookbook.

2. How did you research this market to see if your story would fit with
their needs?

I didn't, actually. I saw Kim's call for submissions and let 'zombie' and 'cookbook' percolate in my mind for a while, then one night a slew of poems came to me. I sent in my best one and it was accepted, and that prompted me to want to write a short story. That took longer to pull together, but it all worked out.

3. What is your process for writing a horror piece?

I sit down with an idea and write. I have a natural inclination to include a bit of horror in just about anything I write. Sometimes I'll sit down and think I'm writing a happy story about a mom walking her child in the park when I blink and the
child is, well, I won't get horrific, so I'll just say, that the child turns
into a monster and Mom doesn't survive.

4. Is horror your specialty? If not, what do you prefer to write and why?

I don't know if it's a specialty, but I always enjoy writing it. I write
in several genres.

5. How did you come up with the idea for your story?

Well, the poem just came to me while I was trying to sleep. And then I wanted to tie the story into the poem, and that took some work. I'd never written about zombies
before and didn't know much about them. A friend told me they have an
aversion to salt, so I did a few Google searches and got some details. I let
the information sit for a while and eventually I sketched out a story while
I was on vacation that seemed to work. I didn't want to make it gory, my
story is a bit upbeat for a zombie tale, I think.

6. Tell us a bit about your other work.

I have short mysteries and other fiction published. My first romance novel was published earlier this year. This was not a genre I ever thought I'd focus on, but now I have my second novel coming out by the end of the year. It's a nice change of pace. I have agent interest in a paranormal thriller. I also have some haikus published. I write non-fiction, too, for magazines.

7. Where can people learn more about you and your writing?

You can look me up at http://lisahaselton.tripod.com and
http://www.myspace.com/lisahaselton

8. Any tips for writers thinking about submitting to an anthology?

I think anthologies are great for getting exposure - your name gets mixed
with others in the business. My first 'anthology' was a short essay in a
calendar last year. Now I have The Zombie Cookbook this year. I have a haiku
in a calendar for next year and am striving for short stories in different
genres. Follow the guidelines and submit on time are my biggest tips - along
with proofing the submission before mailing it in.

Thanks, Lisa.

We also have Cinsearae Santiago with us to answer these same questions.

1. Cinsearae, what attracted you to this particular anthology?

Along with straight horror, I also like horror comedy, and doing a horror comedy concerning zombies sounded like fun, *lol*. The title, “The Zombie Cookbook” alone sounded like a hoot!

2. How did you research this market to see if your story would fit with their needs?

www.DamnationBooks.com specializes in all types of dark fiction, which is right up my alley. I’m also on board as a Book Cover Artist, having designed the cover for the anthology, so I pretty much knew the ins and outs already.

3. What is your process for writing a horror piece?

Oh, that’s easy. I just look at the world’s current events, and how people act towards each other in this day and age. Human behavior plays a big part of what I incorporate into a horror story.

4. Is horror your specialty? If not, what do you prefer to write and why?

Horror is part of my specialty. I write Paranormal Romance, but with a much darker edge to it. I’m not a real believer in h.e.a’s and fairy-tale endings. That’s all cute and everything, but I prefer stories with tension, drama, something to keep me on edge, wanting more. The eeriness and horror aspects only adds more excitement These are the stories I like to create.

5. How did you come up with the idea for your story?

I’m not quite sure, *lol*. I heard a voice in my head yelling about ‘the human condition’, and I suddenly had an idea. How would a zombie in this day and age respond and react to eating certain types of people---those on medication, ones with artificial parts, implants, ones that strictly have junk-food diets…the list was endless! It became a comedy because this ‘poor zombie’ cannot find a plain, ‘untainted’ meal and makes a few wisecracks about us humans. It’s a bit tongue-in-cheek, to say the least!

6. Tell us a bit about your other work.

I’m currently working on a Dark Paranormal Romance series, ABRAXAS, which features a slightly different kind of ‘vampire’, amongst other ghoulies, demons, ghosts and beasties. Magic also abounds, and I’m currently working on the 5th book in the series, due out next year. Anyone interested is more than welcome to visit http://bloodtouch.webs.com/abraxas.htm

I’m also Editor/Publisher of Dark Gothic Resurrected magazine, which specializes in the Gothic/horror/paranormal genres. It comes out twice a year in the spring and fall. I also founded the Gratista Vampire Clan dark writers group, and we publish a bi-annual anthology with assorted themes in the genre. We’re over at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Gratista_Vampires.

8. Where can people learn more about you and your writing?

They can visit my homepage, http://BloodTouch.webs.com for all sorts of info, free downloads of book excerpts, view book trailers, and lots of other goodies.

9. Any tips for writers thinking about submitting to an anthology?

Research the market first and foremost. Read their guidelines carefully, and always give the editor your best, polished work!

Our final guest for today is Linda Neiswender.

1. Hi Linda, tell me what attracted you to this particular anthology?

The Zombie Cookbook was so different, zombies plus recipes- how could I resist? It appealed to my sense of fun and started my mental wheels turning immediately. The story almost wrote itself.

2. How did you research this market to see if your story would fit with their needs?

The market seemed pretty much wide open on this one, not too many zombie cookbooks out there other than the rock band by the same name. So I ran with my original idea, as the guidelines said they were open to anything new.

3. What is your process for writing a horror piece?

I start with the horror focus, in this cased zombies, and try to see if I could give any different spin to it. I also like to throw in some humor with the horror, not being a strictly blood and guts kind of gal. This is only my third horror piece, for Heaven's sake!

4. Is horror your specialty? If not, what do you prefer to write and why?

I haven't written enough to have a specialty yet, but speculative fiction is what I write the most, especially flash speculative fiction. Just growing up in the South, hearing the rich language, I lean towards literary fiction as well. I guess you can say I write all over the place.

5. How did you come up with the idea for your story?

"Zombie + recipes + letters + editor + mayhem = story" was pretty much it, with some humor tossed in to cut the gore. I just brainstormed it after I wrote the initial letters, deciding to kill off the Zombie Cookbook's imaginary editor. Sorry Kim Richards.

6. Tell us a bit about your other work.

I've been published in flash fiction and poetry, and have several partially completed novels lurking in my bottom drawer. I'm a writing newbie as far as publication goes, but my love of writing has been life-long. I want to see some new publishing credits so I'm firing up the story machine in my noggin and may be tackling some new arenas like literary fiction and fantasy.

7. Where can people learn more about you and your writing?

My general blog is Land of Lin at http://landoflin.blogspot.com, and I hope to have a writing blog up soon, once I get a decent picture of myself without the Yeti headgear (yes that is my writing hat for tough scenes, to scare my brain into making that word quota).

8. Any tips for writers thinking about submitting to an anthology?

Do some research on the publisher's other anthologies if possible and follow submission guidelines to the letter. Write your piece to the call for submission if you can rather than submitting something you already have as a “make do.” You'll stand a better chance at acceptance.

My thanks to all these wonderful writers for sharing their useful writing tips.

6 comments:

  1. Hi Penny, thanks for the interviews with us The Zombie Cookbook authors. I'll suggest to my zombie friends that they definitely go after you last, LOL.

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  2. Thanks for the interviews, Penny, much appreciated. Just for the record, the correct spelling of my last name is Neiswender in case any of you go looking for me. One of those funky old German names that nobody can pronounce, not even zombies.

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  3. Very nice set of interviews, all! Enjoyed reading!

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  4. Thanks, Lin. I really appreciate that. I'd hate to be on the menu....

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  5. Oops, Mea culpa, Lin. I checked it too! Sigh... I'll fix in the document.

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  6. Valerie, thanks for stopping by and commenting. I'm glad you enjoyed the interviews.

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