Sunday, January 17, 2010

Review Feisty Family Values



REVIEW
Feisty Family Values
By: B. D. Tharp
Five Star Publishing, 2010
ISBN-13: 978-1-59414-849-1

This review is based on a review copy provided by B. D. Tharp in
exchange for review, all reviews being my own opinion without guarantee
or assumption of liking or disliking.


Feisty Family Values is a refreshing change of pace for contemporary
women's literature. The three main characters have gray, blue and
salt-and-pepper hair. They are flawed in numerous ways. All three have
issues which make them realistic and human. One is a snob, another has
low self-esteem, while the third fears getting close to the man who
loves her.

While the book deals with intense emotional issues of domestic violence,
child abuse and breast cancer, it does so with empathy and a light touch of humor. The humor does not detract from the seriousness of these issues, but allows the reader to more easily identify with the characters.

Regina inherited her Grandmere's lovely home and her mother's bias
against people beneath her - especially her poor relations. She lives
with her dear friend, Matilda. Regina enjoys her quiet life, her fine
things, and her personal space.

Enter her cousin, Annabelle. Annabelle's mother married an abusive man
and following in her mother's footsteps, Annabelle is forced into a
similar marriage. Unfortunately, her daughter inherits her father's
temper and control issues. After living with her daughter and
grandchildren, Annabelle is forced out and into the unwilling arms of
her cousin, Regina.

Matilda (Tillie) is Regina's best friend and room mate. While battling
her own demon, cancer, she attempts to bring peace between the cousins.
When a handsome man moves in across the street, sparks fly between him
and Tillie and romance ensues.

Adding to the mix and tension are Annabelle's three grandchildren who
are dumped on Regina's door step just as Regina is getting used to the
idea of having Annabelle living in her home. Meanwhile, the ghost of
Regina's mother constantly harasses Regina in an attempt to turn her
away from the problems of her cousins.

This is a story of friendship, of finding strength within oneself, and
of three women coming to terms with their feelings for each other and
for the men in their lives. I found this to be a quick read with the
pacing designed to keep the reader turning the pages. Each of the
characters grows as the story comes to a climax and each finds peace as
she does so.

2 comments:

  1. Nice review, Penny. I like that you point this out right away:
    "While the book deals with intense emotional issues of domestic violence,
    child abuse and breast cancer, it does so with empathy and a light touch of humor. The humor does not detract from the seriousness of these issues, but allows the reader to more easily identify with the characters."
    Sounds like good book!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Jessi, thanks for stopping by and commenting. I did enjoy reading Feisty Family Values and hope others will, too.

    ReplyDelete