Friday, March 8, 2013

Vicki Batman, Little Birdie Who...and Other Stories



AUTHOR: Vicki Batman 
BOOK TITLE: Little Birdie Who…and Other Stories
PUBLISHER: Indie

Why don't you start with telling us a little about yourself? What genre do you write in and why?

 I began writing nine years ago when a friend challenged me. She knew I wanted to, but was too shy to make the commitment. After her challenge, I wrote eight chapters, and she told me to keep going. Twenty-three short stories later… 

I write contemporary romantic short fiction and have written three romantic mysteries which I haven't sold (any takers?).

Tell me about your current book which you are promoting.

Little Birdie Who…and Other Stories has three rejections from Women's World magazine. I know, you're thinking if they rejected these, they must be cr---. Quite the contrary! WW gets over 200 submissions a week. "This is NOT Working" took first place in the Book Breeze short story contest last year. "Check Her Out" was published by Longandshortreviews.com

Do you outline before you write? If not, what’s your initial process?

Not really, but sorta. Something--usually--makes my head go bing! And I take off. But because I write romance, we know there is an opening hook, a black moment, and ta-da! a happily-ever-after. So I have an idea what will happen where and aim stuff there.

What comes first: the plot or the characters?
Most of the time, the character and it is because I hear them say something. And I'm off!
Which of your characters do you love/hate/fear/pity the most and why?

So far, my all-time favorite male character is in a story I sold to True Romance, Officer Webber Whitlock. The heroine calls him Witless; however, he is anything but. It is a very funny story.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Making sure the writing zings.
Did your book require a lot of research? How long does it take to write a book for you?

My research is weird. I've done some on plumbing, Christmas trees, fruitcake, office furniture.

Some stories take longer than others. They just do.

Describe your writing space.
I have an awesome desk with a wooden top and sculpted iron legs. To my right is a lamp fashioned from an old silver pitcher. Behind that, the CPU. To my left, is a stack of papers and behind that, a paper bin with books and papers. In front of the monitor is a row of things-to-do sticky notes. I have a love seat and matching chair with a red, double decker side table. All my covers hang on the walls. Behind my chair are four bookcases. A large window looks on to the porch where squirrels run by. Occasionally, a lizard creeps along the wrought iron railing. Lots of varieties of birds play in the flowering quince. It's quite loverly.
What do you like to do when you’re not writing?
I workout every day--Jazzercise and yoga. Walk some. Read a lot. And am addicted to needlepoint and Mah-jongg.
What books or authors have influenced your writing?

When my #1 son was a tot, I devoured Dick Francis mysteries. Handsome asked why I liked him so and I said because I wished I could write like him. It took me 20 years to try. I like Janet Evanovich because she writes funny and so do I.

What are your current books out right now, and what are the books coming up for
release?

"Twinkle Lights," "Store Wars," "Man Theory and Other Stories," "I Believe." A new one may come out in March.

What advice would you give a new writer just starting out?

Persevere. Persevere. Persevere.

Where can people learn more about you and your work?

Find me at: http://vickibatman.blogspot.com. http://plottingprincesses.blogspot.com And at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, and Smashwords.com






Synopsis: Little Birdie Who… and Other Stories

"This is NOT Working": One of those days at a new job when nothing is going right until the new boss steps in.

"Check Her Out": Gum: it’s a sticky situation, especially between the store manager and Auntie Caren when her nephew has to pay for the package he stole.

"Little Birdie Who… ": A new town, a new friend, a new beginning. Who would have thought a little bird could bring two people together?

1 comment:

  1. Nice interview and excerpt! I always liked Dick Francis, too!

    ReplyDelete