Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Lillian Brummet, Purple Snowflake Marketing, plus #giveaway





AUTHOR: Lillian Brummet

BOOK TITLE: Purple Snowflake Marketing

PUBLISHERs: CreateSpace.com & Smashwords.com

BUY LINKs: http://www.brummet.ca/promotebooks.html  - where a list of several online sites sell this book including the publisher’s sites:
GIVEAWAY:
 Jump Start for Writers e-book http://www.brummet.ca/Jumpstart.html
* Alternatively, or in addition, I can offer a package of 6 eco-friendly bookmarks for a North American winner only (due to shipping issues.


Q: Tell me a little about your book.

Purple Snowflake Marketing offers a realistic guide to what authors can expect to face and how to employ research and preparation to make a memorable first impression. As you put together a marketing plan, you will be able to proceed with the confidence of a seasoned writer. This book is packed with value, with over 1000 resources along with stats and inspiring quotes to assist you in developing that unique marketing plan for each book you write. This book compiles information we’ve learned in our own research, courses and business experience - plus more than 13 years of experience in the industry as freelance writers, published poets, former professional book reviewers, staff writers, authoring our 5 books with traditional, self-publishing and e-book outlets and as members of the media ourselves.



Q: What gave you the idea for this particular book?

Back in 2007 I was inundated with questions from various forums, message boards and emails from people interested in how we went about building our successful branding, grew our platform, and continually appear in the media. In those days I earned the titles: Pink Bunny (because our marketing success went on and on) and Book Marketing Guru from those who received advice. At this time I realized that a lot of the information I was giving out was repetitive, and that resulted in the first manuscript. Now the Purple Snowflake Marketing book is out in a 3rd edition of 378 pages offering start-up advice on how to set up the office, organization, deal with family/friends, and both business plan tips and a step-by-step guide to creating a unique marketing plan. It now offers over 1000 resources as well in the appendices.

Q: Are you a full-time writer or part-time, and how do you organize your writing time?

(She laughs) Well I’d love to be a full time writer, but as a self-marketing entrepreneur writer – that means I have to run the office, take care of book-keeping and record keeping files, deal with ongoing communications, query members of the media, networking, managing the radio show that airs 3 X per week and the daily blog …and somehow here and there I get some writing in. Writing time is scheduled in when I’m working on a manuscript or article. My days are flexible in that I can move things around to suit whatever is most important to accomplish that day. Manuscripts take a long time, however, so those get scheduled in whenever I have the headspace and the inspiration to get back to the projects. Once a manuscript has been developed, the hard work comes in the form of editing and proof reading and rewrites before formatting and imagery are added in. So at that stage I tend to clear my schedule as much as possible so that I can crunch those activities out.

Q: When did you first know you wanted to be a writer?

I started very young writing stories that brought my teachers to tears, poetry that both shocked and awed friends who read them and various writing contests I joined just to see if I would be accepted. Sadly, I never took the career seriously because I doubted myself too much. It wasn’t until 1998 after being involved in a vehicle accident and subsequently losing my business that I started to look at writing more seriously. I was desperate to find a way to leave a legacy, to create a lasting positive ripple and give meaning to my life. For the first couple years I concentrated on taking writing courses and gleaning from old business course materials I had saved, learning the craft, how to query and work with a variety of publishers, magazines and local publications. One of my articles was picked up as a column and that ran internationally in several publications for about 6 years. Once that happened I decided to write the first manuscript based on that column and that is when Dave jumped in to help produce a high quality book – called Trash Talk, which is now in a 3rd edition as a 2-book series.

Q: What do you hope readers will take from your writing?

The main focus of everything we do is to encourage and empower people to become proactive and create a conscious, sustainable and informed lifestyle. I suppose that is why I prefer to write in non-fiction genres – while this involves more research, interviews and organization – it allows me to share real life tools, quotes, interviews, and skills the reader can use in their own lives.

Q: What is the toughest part about being a writer and how do you get past it?

The toughest part of being a writer is dealing with the emotional lows – you know, when you get inundated with paperwork and filing, when sales aren’t coming in and you have to do more freelance work or workshops to make ends meet, when the numbers of radio listeners or blog readers slide down for a short time before climbing back up again. These low periods can cause one to become tired, overwhelmed, and sometimes depressed. I tend to have a lot of inspiring quotes on my bulletin board and a note to myself as well in my own words that remind me of this passion and why I am doing this regardless of the bank account statements.

Here is one of my favorite quotes:

"You are not here merely to make a living. You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget the errand."

~ Woodrow Wilson



Q: What is your marketing plan?

The marketing plan is revised every year with goals for each month, and then broken down to what I hope to achieve each week. It is a flexible plan so that if something should come up I can deal with it and not have regrets about letting something go for a while. I have a powerful reach online via social networking sites, my daily blog, the website, the radio show… and I appear in the media at least twice a week and as many as 12 times a month. I write promotional filler articles for blogs, do a lot of interviews like this one, and am constantly taking down notes for future marketing opportunities that I can follow up on when the schedule allows.

Q: What’s in the future for you?

Well, right now we are looking at getting advertisers and sponsors set up for the radio show and blog, and we are releasing a 6th book (2nd book of poetry) later this year. I have 2 other manuscripts that I am just now finding the time to get back to and I can hardly wait for them to be ready for the public.

Q: You mentioned earlier that Dave works with you in creating the books – how did you two get together on this?

Dave is a phenomenal writer – he has an ability to connect with the reader by manipulating the content to pull their heartstrings and peak their interest. He also has the ability to create cover designs, images, formatting and book promotion materials. So when I started creating manuscripts he was very supportive and wanted to help with his natural skills that I don’t possess. So I do the research, interviews and manuscript development, and he takes over at that point to work his magic. Once the book is released, he’ll update the website and create marketing images for me to use and I start on the marketing campaign for that project.  Dave is better at public marketing and event work, while I tend to deal with print and online media. So we balance each other out fairly well. Dave prefers to write in fiction and travel formats and has several manuscripts of his own that he works on when time allows.

Q: What are the difficulties of co-authoring a book?

We have to be patient with one-another, giving each other space to do things in their own time – yet cheerleading in the background to encourage growth and creativity. We have to learn how to work with each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and that can take some time to figure out. We have to have a business plan, a business contract and as part of the estate planning – a legal documentation giving each other the power to take over the business activities should the other be unable to do so.

Q: What are the benefits of co-writing?

What I love most about it is that all the work is not on my shoulders and I don’t have to outsource a lot of work, making it easier on the budget. I have a sounding board, a cheerleader in the background, a support system and a hug when I need it.

Q: Any tips for other authors wanting to co-author?

I would suggest that you have several meetings about the project keeping minutes of those meetings so you can refer to them later. Get to know the individual’s passions, why they want to get involved, what they can offer, what they are willing to learn, what kinds of connections they have, how much time they have and what time of day they’ll be available to work on the project. Get everything in writing so that you are both protected in case emotions get in the way. Have a contingency plan in place, revise the business and marketing plan often, and be sure to have a legal document in place so that a partner can take over if the other one is unable to continue on the project. And finally – continue to schedule in regular meetings after the book is published.




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Award-winning authors Dave and Lillian Brummet: owners of the Brummet Media Group(http://brummet.ca), offering book publishing services from formatting to cover design, graphic design and promotion material creation, books and CD's, the Conscious Discussions Talk Radio:http://www.blogtalkradio.com/consciousdiscussions and the Brummet's Conscious Blog:http://www.consciousdiscussions.blogspot.com


4 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your new book. I have a copy of the first Purple Snowflake and need to go back and read it again. Marketing, to me, is so hard. I just want to write, but you have to get out there and promote too. :)

    Best of luck to you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Beverly,
      I remember you !
      I'm so glad that you have a copy of the first edition - the new edition has a lot more information (478 pages) and about a thousand or more resources, and lots more quotes.
      Thank you for the comment :)
      Lillian

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  2. Thank you Penny for inviting me to appear as a guest on your blog - I appreciate it :)

    ReplyDelete